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to exist, right? our strategy in the old days was to align ourselves with a big media company -- cbs. we align ourselves with yahoo! in some way and with ail -- aol in another way. you need the types of connections with more established or at least larger players in order to survive. the other reason is that the proliferation of sites has caused a change in the way people get their news. no longer do they just go to what we call destination sites, which was essentially a newspaper online. they are getting their news on facebook and google and bing and search engines. to be out there in that news sphere, you have to have different ways of attacking a and having connections and distribution arrangements. >> i would like to add that proliferation of new sites creates more demand for content, which creates more opportunity for professional writers. before you think about going into news as a business as an independent publisher, you have to think about what the need is, if there is a need in that particular space for another site, and then how you distinguish yourself and the content you pro
it at scale, and that has been the big challenge. >> can you elaborate on that? what does that mean exactly? >> we would not exist if there was not a feeling that a lot of these communities do not have the experience online of finding the information that is most relevant to them. there are a lot of great weekly newspapers. there are a lot of bulletin boards, facebook woods, you name it. there is a lot of media focused at local, but not every community has it, and even the ones that do often are not getting the kind of service that i think they used to historical because of downsizing and regional newspapers not serving those communities the way they used to. so you will have the council meeting not really being covered. we have had numerous examples where board meetings, council meetings, things that those members got used to not being covered. suddenly, they were seeing the week after week and seeing that we were there to stay. >> in the audience, do you feel like you're communities are being covered well? do you know what is going on in your back yard? do you feel like your stories being
-- dare i say -- not threatened, but some kind of competition has come in from the big boys? you were having a nice conversation earlier. i listen in. do you see yahoo! going local, for example, as a plus, or do you see them as competition? how did you see that? >> first, full disclosure, yahoo! is a content partner for oakland local. they distribute our content on their website. there is some back and forth. some people are wondering what the corporate industries are going to do in a hyperlocal space. i do think there is space for everyone to work together. one of the questions i'm interested in hearing about is whether the corporate entities are interested in working with local entities. we have been working with oakland for the last year-and-a- half, and i have a background in oakland activism, and it has still been difficult for us to get headway as an organization. that kind of community involvement takes a 24/7 kind of commitment. that is slightly different than the commitment it takes to run a yahoo! new site. i'm interested in with the challenges will be, but i'm much more int
but hundreds and hundreds of bodies. >> skeletons. >> skeletons. it was a big scandal. they created a mass grave and moved to the remains. there are pictures. they have thiese skeletons sticking out of the wall. it showed the relative worth. they stopped digging because they would keep finding bodies. >> they are still out there. there are bodies all over the place. they used to bury people in north beach. they would go up there and very bodies. >> there were removed from many of these cemeteries. there is a slogan that is -- anybody know? "it is great to be alive." >> beats the alternative. >> i was wondering if gary boulevard had always been a major thoroughfare. >> it used to have streetcars on it. they are thinking of bringing them back. the b line and the a line where there until the mid-1950's. we are taking the street cars away, but bart will come out here and everything will be fine. >> downtown, gary ave. >> when you get past it, it becomes gary boulevard. >> they wanted streets to be large, they should have vegetation and trees, they should be ornamental. gary strieker was the ma
. the big one that everyone has seen in their lifetime is, when i was a kid, tv was free. across america, it was funded by advertisers. today, the vast majority of americans pay a fee to get television. if the contact mix is right, hard journalism, entertainment, people will pay. all along the spectrum from the complete the paid to be completely ad-funded, you see it all today. one of the crisis we have now is the old model of classified advertising, paying for hard news journalism on paper has broken the, and is being replaced. that business model change had been a constant for 150 years. there are millions of models that work, and will be, and capital can chase them, as you get a 10x return, as you described. >> we want to get to everyone's questions. >> my name is alex. i have heard two major themes about new media. one, that it has a radical democratic potential, low barrier to entry, but i have also heard repeated again and again, in order for your model to be successful, in order for your web site to be successful, you have to hitch your wagon to a large, well-funded, established m
that is not always going to be on super bowl sunday on the big screen. it will not always capture that. if you want to push the revolution now and start handing of guns, you might shoot me, right? we do not have an understanding of exactly what needs to happen and how it needs to happen. i think education is critical. we have to push for an education that we're just not receiving for the most part. there are pockets of that happening, but i think that awareness will produce the next scenario -- the next generation of folks in entertainment, in the arts and all these arenas that are high-profile but with the embedded with this consciousness that will demand the stand up and say something. no more of the michael jordan cannot speak out because politics is not a good thing to speak out against. it will be the jamaican musicians, the peter toshes and bob marleys -- the people -- the politicians had to be responsive to what people were saying and doing because there was a movement around these high- profile folks. they cannot just represent the movement. they have to come out of the movement. it has to
. [applause] [horns honking] announcer: big dreams and good grades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to [music] ♪[applause] thank you. >> thank you for applauding. never know. [laughter]. so, these next few pieces are jewish art songs the jewish art song is not something that most people know about even if you are into classical music. raise your hand if you know shoemoner shoebert? these songs are actually in yiddish but they are art songs. they are beautiful. and they are not done. right. soy, i hope you enjoy the next few pieces. i will describe them. the first was written by [inaudible] a song that has almost nonsentence words but it's your time to be with god and your moment alone with whatever you need. i hope you appreciate this one. [music] ♪[applause] >> thank you. so the next piece, it's beautiful. this is yiddish a beautiful song that was given to me by george rosenside who is an amazing person. and this next piece was the sam
, because there is a shortage of nursing programs and a big demand. perhaps, i hope that institutions like samuel merritt and others consider things like dental hygiene, which we also have a shortage of and not enough programs. that is a conversation for another day, but it is definitely a need, and there is a demand for the services of many of the training that this institution provides. so that is very important and is something that has job opportunities at the end of it. president olague: closing the hearing. >> this places us on item 10, and informational item on formula retail. >> good afternoon. i am part of the department staff. this is an informational presentation you requested on the current status of formula retail. a full report was included in your packet. i will make every presentation. this is the type of retail sales activity or establishment which, along with 11 or more locations in the united states, maintains two or more the following features. a standardized a ray of merchandise, a standardized assad, a standardized de corps, and color scheme, uniform apparel, standard
partners. this is a big thank you to microsoft for investing in our kids. before i start, i want to work knowledge a couple of people. our director of san francisco education and a wonderful partner. kimberly is here with her team. marie from the school district, and laurie, who heads our bridge to success program. these are folks that are making all of this happened. thank you for being here. i would like to welcome our host and chancellor from city college to welcome you and opened this up, dr. don griffin. [applause] >> thank you for being here today. i hope you are excited about mission campus. this is one of our finest campuses, but do not be fooled -- we have nine others, most of which are larger than this. we are very excited about you being here. one, i think you made a commitment to go to college, and college has made a commitment to you. we are trying to, this summer for the summer bridge, make college real for you. in other words, so there is no getting lost or confused about how to get financial aid, counseling, and all those things. this program here is for the students. we
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)